Freelancer Vs. Full-time Developer-Pros & Cons of hiring an Independent Developer

Over past few years, the “gig” of working has been transformed rapidly. Access to remote work has changed the definition of work and work place. More and More people prefer working from home or off-site, infact recruiters do prefer to hire a freelancer reason behind, they are going to charge less.

The rise of freelance nation has largely been a win-win on both sides of the desk. Employers experience financial savings with independent contractors, and lower their risk.

But on the same time, both employees and employers do not want to go on the freelancing route . By the employer’s point of view they may prefer the dedicated commitment that goes along with a full-time employee. Employees may prefer the stability of full-time job, or find benefits like health insurance and retirement funds desirable or necessary.

Pros:

Cost:

Even at a higher hourly rate, employer can save 20 to 30 percent annually even with a freelancer when you factor in not having to pay for benefits. If your worker is remote, you also save the space for office and lower your office supply costs.

Risk Reduction:

Because freelancers are not employees, employers’ risk is reduced. Freelancers have no right to collect unemployment insurance, almost never have a right to workers’ compensation benefits, nor do they generally have the right to sue for harassment or discrimination.Because freelancers are not employees, employers’ risk is reduced. Freelancers have no right to collect unemployment insurance, almost never have a right to workers’ compensation benefits, nor do they generally have the right to sue for harassment or discrimination.

Access:

With the meteoric rise in talent-pairing platforms, you can find even the most unique worker to meet your needs. 

Quality:

Freelancers run their own business, which thrives on repeat work and repeat customers. They strive to turn in their best work, every time, to maintain the relationship.

Limiting Payroll:

Many companies cite legislative measures to keep their headcount low. Using freelancers who are not considered employees can help get work done, without adding to headcount.

Global Reach:

Companies look to freelancers to find talent outside their geographical limits. Expansion or an understanding of new markets can be made with a finite budget outlay.

Cons:

Multi-Tasking:

An independent contractors’ job is to develop their business. You need to make sure they’re available on your schedule, not theirs. They may be great when they’re accessible, but be prepared with a Plan B if they’re not. Many companies recruit a team of freelancers, so they always have backup.

Relationship Building:

If you’re looking to develop clientele, a freelancer might not be the best choice. In-house employees are aware of everything that’s going on in the company, and can leverage that knowledge to your advantage when building relationships with clients. Freelancers don’t have that access.

Training and Supervision:

What amount of time will you need to invest in training? If there is a long lead time for them to get up and running, using that investment on a full-time employee might be a better option. And if the position requires oversight, hire an employee. A freelancer might choose to perform the work outside of normal business hours, when you’re not able to monitor their progress.

Investment:

While a freelancer wants to keep you as a client, your company’s individual success is not their priority. A full-time employee is likely to feel a higher level of commitment to your organisation, and therefore more motivated to add to the bottom line.  

–So to all the recruiters, out there I would strongly recommend you to consider these points before making any hasty decisions.